The development of architecture throughout history

Roman aqueduct in Segovia, Spain Dome:

The development of architecture throughout history

The largest, Spartacontrolled about square miles of territory; the smallest had just a few hundred people. However, by the dawn of the Archaic period in the seventh century B.

They all had economies that were based on agriculture, not trade: Also, most had overthrown their hereditary kings, or basileus, and were ruled by a small number of wealthy aristocrats.

Visit Website These people monopolized political power. For example, they refused to let ordinary people serve on councils or assemblies. They also monopolized the best farmland, and some even claimed to be descended from the gods.

The development of architecture throughout history

Land was the most important source of wealth in the city-states; it was also, obviously, in finite supply. The pressure of population growth pushed many men away from their home poleis and into sparsely populated areas around Greece and the Aegean.

By the end of the seventh century B. Each of these poleis was an independent city-state. In this way, the colonies of the Archaic period were different from other colonies we are familiar with: The people who lived there were not ruled by or bound to the city-states from which they came.

The new poleis were self-governing and self-sufficient. The Rise of the Tyrants As time passed and their populations grew, many of these agricultural city-states began to produce consumer goods such as pottery, cloth, wine and metalwork.

Anglo Saxon Architecture

Trade in these goods made some people—usually not members of the old aristocracy—very wealthy. These people resented the unchecked power of the oligarchs and banded together, sometimes with the aid of heavily-armed soldiers called hoplites, to put new leaders in charge.

These leaders were known as tyrants. Some tyrants turned out to be just as autocratic as the oligarchs they replaced, while others proved to be enlightened leaders.

Pheidon of Argos established an orderly system of weights and measures, for instance, while Theagenes of Megara brought running water to his city.

The field's new reproduction system

However, their rule did not last: The colonial migrations of the Archaic period had an important effect on its art and literature: Sculptors created kouroi and korai, carefully proportioned human figures that served as memorials to the dead.

Scientists and mathematicians made progress too: Anaximandros devised a theory of gravity; Xenophanes wrote about his discovery of fossils; and Pythagoras of Kroton discovered his famous theorem.

The economic, political, technological and artistic developments of the Archaic period readied the Greek city-states for the monumental changes of the next few centuries.Featured Building of Chicago Transitions in architecture.

Built in two phases, the Monadnock Building demonstrates a visible shift from load-bearing construction to skeleton frame construction—a change that happened throughout .

Throughout human existence, homes have varied drastically in scope, size, and design. Cob houses originated in the eleventh century, are made from straw and earth, and last for hundreds of years. Sustainable development is the organizing principle for meeting human development goals while at the same time sustaining the ability of natural systems to provide the natural resources and ecosystem services upon which the economy and society depend.

The desired result is a state of society where living conditions and resource use . Sep 03,  · The amazing works of art and architecture known as the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World serve as a testament to the ingenuity, imagination . American Architecture (cpresent): History of Building Design in United States: Colonial, Neoclassical, Gothic Revival, Skyscrapers, Modernism.

Approaches to Architecture Development Print Definition: Architecture development can be thought of as both a process and a discipline that aids the development of mission-effective systems.

Architecture in the Middle Ages | Middle Ages