Assessing writing across the curriculum in elementary

Miller and Co, Oxford University Press, Princeton, Vienna, November Wolfgang Danspeckgruber ed. Liechtenstein Institute on Self-Determination,

Assessing writing across the curriculum in elementary

In addition, media industries belong to a powerful network of corporations that exert influence on content and distribution.

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Questions of ownership and control are central — a relatively small number of individuals control what we watch, read and hear in the media. In media literacy, what or who is absent may be more important than what or who is included.

As a result, media have great influence on politics and on forming social change. Who and what is shown in a positive light? This includes the technical, commercial and storytelling demands of each medium: In what ways are the images in the media product manipulated through various techniques for example: What are the expectations of the genre for example: Start and end with the key concepts Media education, and the media world, can feel overwhelming when you start to analyze it.

Teach kids that critiquing is not necessarily the same thing as criticizing and that we can identify and talk about problematic issues in the media we love without losing our enjoyment of them.

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How are the commercial considerations of a movie different from those of a book or a play? What technical differences change how the story is told?

How are the expectations of a movie audience different from those of a play or a book? Make media education about asking questions, not learning answers Even though you may feel strongly about an issue or a media product, give your students room to come to their own conclusions.

Make sure that your evaluations are as well thought-out and objective as they are for all your other assignments, and keep them consistent: Let students bring their own media to the table To get students more engaged, look for opportunities for them to do media literacy work with their choice of media products.

You can see our Curriculum Charts to get specific information on how each of our lessons and resources meets the curriculum of different courses in your province or territory. In History classes, students can look at how their views of history and historical events have been shaped by media.

Studying films, newspapers and even their own textbooks can help students see how the nature of each medium shapes how history is told. How are families depicted in different media? How has this changed with time?

Do media portrayals of family follow trends in society, or do they influence them or both? Health and Physical Education: What influence does media consumption have on what we eat?

assessing writing across the curriculum in elementary

How does it affect our decisions about smoking, drinking, and drug use? What kinds of relationships do we see modeled in media products popular with youth, and what messages do youth take from them?

assessing writing across the curriculum in elementary

How do the commercial pressures of the music industry affect the creation of music? How are things like gender, class, relationships, or alcohol and drug use depicted in music and music videosand how do youth interpret these messages?

How do media products popular with youth portray crime and the criminal justice system? How are these portrayals influenced by the values or assumptions of the media creators, by commercial considerations, or by the influence of different genres cop shows, action games, etc.

Visual and Fine Arts: How do artists use, appropriate and deconstruct media products to create new art? However, teachers sometimes find it more difficult to create assessment and evaluation tools for media education than for other subjects.

There are two important steps to creating objective, comprehensive and meaningful assessment and evaluation tools for media literacy work. The first is to use an evaluation tool such as a rubric that allows you to assess work in more than one way and that makes expectations clear to students.

The second is to frame the expectations within the rubric in terms of the key concepts of media literacy. Based on how well the student applies specific technical skills associated with either the medium being studied movies, TV, video games, etc.

Within each of those four areas, you can create expectations using questions based on the key concepts: Does the student show an understanding of how the media product was created? Few media products are made by a single author.

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Does the student show an understanding of this concept, and of what elements in a medium or a particular product would be relevant to it?Through NSTA, you'll find leading resources for excellence in teaching and learning and experience growth through robust professional development.

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English Language Arts Standards Download the standards Print this page The Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects (“the standards”) represent the next generation of K–12 standards designed to prepare all students for success in college, career, and life by the time they graduate from high school.

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Project-based learning (PBL) is a student-centered pedagogy that involves a dynamic classroom approach in which it is believed that students acquire a deeper knowledge through active exploration of real-world challenges and problems.

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